Someone Always Talking “Incurable”, And It’s Never Really True.

Ok. I can see it with so called ALS, a health problem I have been working on a lot lately. While a person so called diagnosed with ALS can solve the problem and heal, I can see why someone might get, or fall for, the incorrect idea that it’s incurable with any currently available method. For one thing, the mainstream organizations involved with so called ALS say this incurable thing constantly. For another, solving it can take a fair amount of knowledge and work.

The same could possibly be said for other problems, such as those called multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. While all are solvable, a huge proportion of people believe otherwise, and solving them can be challenging. So I can see why someone would fall for the incurable story there too.

Check this out though.

I had been bitten by a tick or something and so I started reading up on so called Lyme disease, and guess what. There it was again. While some were talking about what they had done to solve health problems so called diagnosed as Lyme disease, there was someone going on and on about how it’s “incurable”. Huh? This is just little old Lyme disease we are talking about, and while I realize some people so called diagnosed with Lyme disease experience chronic health problems, many do succeed in solving the problem and never again have Lyme disease related health issues. All the same, someone was maintaining that it’s “incurable”.

Same thing with diabetes. On a diabetes related discussion board and other places, I saw some were talking about what they were doing to solve the problem, both types, while one or two people were insisting nothing could be done. What?? Nothing to be done about diabetes even? Even the mainstream news has stories about people doing things about diabetes. Still somehow someone shows up saying otherwise.

I bet for every health problem, right alongside people talking about how to solve it one can find people who insist that can’t be done.

Why do people do this, even when information indicating the contrary is right there in front of them?

For a variety of reasons, such as these.

Some shy away from the idea that they are somehow responsible for the health problems they are experiencing. Others are addicted to their or someone else’s being sick and are terrified to think that they could heal. Others seem to enjoy playing expert by repeating what they have read somewhere or been told. Some who do medical research basically get paid to look for cures for the incurable and would much rather believe and promote the “currently incurable” point of view. Others seem to like the drama of the whole incurable thing, and there are plenty of other reasons people talk this nonsense.

Meanwhile, in close to twenty years of being involved in solving disease problems, I have never ever seen one that is not solvable. I have seen people solve cancer, autoimmune issues, allergies, infection types of problems, neurological problems, digestive problems, learning issues, all kinds of supposedly incurable stuff, and other problems that one supposedly one cannot solve just by changing diet or working holistically somehow. Even in the cases of health problems I have not yet seen solved, as soon as I look into them, I start finding clues to what to do about them.

So if, or when, you hear a story about something being “incurable”, don’t fall for it, and if you are being affected by some supposedly incurable health problem, do what I have seen many do successfully. Assume there is a way, or are ways, to solve the problem and start looking for them. Look into one thing after another. Look for people who say they have solved similar problems and find out what they did. Look and look and work and work until you too have figured out how to heal and once again demonstrated that where there is a will there is a way.

Stem Cells – Never Going To Save You From Yourself

This thing about stem cells has been going on for a while now. Some people are against embryonic stem cell research, while others say that that stance is foolish as the research is a path to finding cures. Others say similar things can be done with stem cells from sources other than embryos.

Whatever their side on that debate, many feel that stem cell research will lead to better health for many, with ways of solving diseases like Parkinson’s, als, multiple sclerosis and diabetes on the way.

I say, don’t be ridiculous.

I mean sure, there are things people can already do with stem cells, and as time goes there will more methods that are useful somehow.

All the same, what you can be certain of is that people cannot really attain wellness by using stem cells, no matter how much research is done.

Why?

Because wellness is a lifestyle thing, a choices thing, a long term thing, something people attain or not because of how they live, day to day and minute to minute.

Let’s take multiple sclerosis, for instance.

Multiple sclerosis is really all about repressed emotions, internal imbalances and other physical issues created by people.

What this means is that you can throw all the stem cells you want at the problem and if the person experiencing the problem keeps doing those same things and creating the same issues that person is going to keep experiencing multiple sclerosis.

The same goes for any form of illness.

Now I will concede, that maybe somehow once a person changes the way he or she is living, somehow stem cells could be used to repair the damage done.  Even here though, there are better ways to accomplish things.

Also, consider this. Life works in parallels. Steal from others and somehow you are stealing from yourself. Hurt others and somehow you are hurting yourself. So, while I am not sure what the parallel is for chop up a partly formed baby and inject yourself with the pieces, I am sure there is a parallel and it’s not something you want to learn about the hard way.

So whatever your stance is on stem cell research, whatever way you might be pinning your hopes on it, whether that means looking for future breakthroughs or traveling today to far off lands for injections, you can be sure of one unchanging thing. If you want to be healthy, you need to take responsibility and live in a wellness creating way. Your health is up to you and no amount of stem cell research can save you from yourself.

From Five Pills A Day To None – Guess What It Took

The other day, after asking me what I do, someone said “I believe in that” and told me about the example of her brother in law who had been diagnosed with all kinds of problems, including diabetes, and was taking five prescription pills a day.

Now, she says, he is in much better shape, has dropped two pants sizes and no longer needs any of those pills. His doctor is amazed, even confused, by the change.

What a change it is too.

I mean for one thing, drugs more block than cure, so in a way all the problems were still there, just blocked somehow, buried by the medication. Furthermore, while the medication was keeping one set of problems in check, you can be sure it was creating all kinds of new ones and the guy was headed for even worse trouble, and, by the way, all of this was probably costing plenty, not just for pills, but for the doctor visits and all the other stuff that goes along with being in such a state as to need all that medication.

Maybe most importantly, of course, not only does he no longer need all the medication, but I suspect he feels much better, in multiple ways, than he ever did when he was taking it.

Ok.  So what did it take to accomplish this?

Did it take months or years of extreme diet changes and working out? Did it take psychotherapy, years of meditation, or doing something radical like moving to a different state? Did it take some kind of bizarre surgery that involved removing a gland or something or cutting part of his brain or installing some kind of technology?

Nah.

It took working with a nutritionist to improve his diet and it took doing some regular exercise and it took less than two months.

While it may not work this quickly and easily for everyone, in this case that’s all it took to go from being a heavily medicated, out of shape time bomb to being a much healthier person using zero medication.

Imagine that.

Which brings up another question. What on earth goes on in medical school?

A Key to Healing – Rather Than Blaming A Disease, Take Responsibility and Make Changes

I have heard this type of thing time after time, “Such and such disease makes you weak.”

Wrong. There is no such thing as such and such disease making a person weak, or numb, or tired, or shaking.

Nope.

So what’s doing it then? Why are people weak, or numb, or tired, or shaking, or whatever?

They and the people around them are making things that way, that’s why.

So a key concept in healing is getting to feeling responsible, and in control, of what is going on with your health.

For instance, in one case I dealt with, a guy diagnosed with als was talking about biting his tongue. He thought that als somehow makes a person bite his tongue. He felt out of control.

So I suggested he look at it differently, that rather than als making him bite his tongue that actually he himself was somehow making him bite his tongue. That put things into a whole different perspective. Now he felt much more in control and as if he could find a way to solve the problem.

Another one I have heard is that multiple sclerosis makes a person weak. Nah. Multiple sclerosis is not doing anything. Multiple sclerosis can’t do anything. Why? Because multiple sclerosis is just a name someone made up. What makes a person weak is people’s making choices that result in a person’s immune system attacking the person’s nervous system. Then the nerves don’t transmit signals and the person feels weak.

Diabetes does not make it difficult to utilize sugar. People make it difficult for themselves to use sugar.

Parkinson’s disease does not make people shaky. They make themselves shaky, by stressing themselves out and repressing emotions and doing other things that cause their systems to break down.

Adhd does not make it difficult to focus.

Alzheimer’s does not cause memory loss and dementia.

Asthma does not make breathing difficult.

Whatever a person has going on, the key thing to realize is that it is just a logical consequence of ways of living and choices the person is making.

Then it is clear what needs to be done to make things better.

If you want to be stronger, figure out how to get stronger. If you want to stop biting your tongue, figure out why you are doing it and make some changes. If you are getting shaky or are having trouble remembering things or if your cholesterol level is sky high, just get to work making changes that will make you healthier.

It was you, with the help of others, doing it all along, and it is you who can solve the problem.

Knowing Better and Still Not Doing It – “That’s the sickness.”

A week or two ago I called a friend, Diego, to see how things were going with his blood pressure. He had had really, really high blood pressure, so high that a doctor seemed concerned about even letting him walk out of the office. Diego also had come up with a pretty solid plan for solving the problem, one involving things like diet changes, weight loss, exercise and changing the way he handles life issues.

Hey. That sounded like a great idea for a story, maybe called “My Friend Diego Solves Insanely High Blood Pressure. Here’s How.”

So before writing it I wanted to confirm that he had gotten the job done.

“It is lower.”  He told me.

So it was fixed, solved, the pressure in some kind of normal or healthy range?

“No.”

I told him about my story idea and he told me that I could just wait, maybe give him another month and all would be well and I could write about it. He said he was psyched, that the idea of the story was even a good incentive for him to get on with it.

So I called him today to see how our little project was going.

The answer? No progress.

“That’s the sickness” he said. Then he noted the similarity to what his mother had done, when she had basically chosen to die rather than taking advantage of healing resources he had provided for her, and he suggested that instead of writing about his success I should write about his lack of it. “That’s the sickness.”

Not a bad idea. What he said is so right on, and what he has going on is so common. It’s a level of sickness, one in which a person knows basically how to solve a problem and for some reason, inertia, unconscious issues, or whatever, leaves the problem unsolved.

Me personally, I don’t get it. I mean, sure I get it. I understand psychology and habits and things like that. Still, I don’t get it.

For one thing, being sick can be a total drag. In Diego’s case, for instance, he has real reason to be concerned about the consequences of continuing to live with what is still rather high blood pressure.

For another, solving things can be so straightforward. Losing that eighty pounds of extra weight, for instance, seems simple. Just eat less than you burn.

So between one thing and another, staying sick, especially when one has at hand an actual plan for getting healthy, seems insane to me.

Solving back problems, lowering bad cholesterol, solving diabetes, solving cancer, resolving relationship issues, any kind of thing, a person can do it, if the person just gets through the knowing what to do level to the actually doing it level.

Like Michael J. Fox, Stuck In A Box

A couple of years ago I contacted the Michael J. Fox Foundation to discuss helping him get healthy. Clearly the so called Parkinson’s disease he is experiencing could be solved using a holistic approach. So far nothing much has come of my contacting them, beyond my seeing advertising for the foundation and marveling at how this guy is surrounded by people who are working hard at doing things that for the most part will never get him healthy.

The story goes on though. The other day, in connection with what I am doing regarding so called als, I talked with someone involved in the als scene who himself has been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. After talking with him, just for a kick I did an internet search to see what resources might be out there that would be useful in solving Parkinson’s.

Wow. Within maybe ten minutes, I had found not one, but three websites that have all kinds of information on solving Parkinson’s disease, methods that sound credible to me, a person who knows how these things work, and even ways to contact and get mentoring from people who have solved or are in the process of solving Parkinson’s disease.

So let me get this straight. Michael J. Fox with all his resources and a whole organization, not to mention the guy I had just talked with, are running around looking for a cure for something that plenty of people have already figured out how to solve.

Hmm. Now that sounds familiar.

For one thing, it sounds a whole lot like the als scene, where there is one group going around saying nobody survives and that we need to find a cure, and there is a whole other group of people who are solving the problem for themselves and getting healthier.

I also ran into the same thing in the diabetes scene, where, while on a message board a guy was bashing someone because that person had suggested that diabetes is solvable through lifestyle changes, elsewhere there are people talking about how they have solved their diabetes problems, both type one and type two.

Alzheimer’s, Hungtington’s, similar situations.

Which makes me wonder, maybe for every type of illness there are those lamenting the lack of a so called cure and looking high and low for a magic bullet, and at the same time there are plenty of others who are solving the problem.

So if you are having health problems, ask yourself which group you are going to choose to be in. Are you going to stay in a box, or are you going to take responsibility for your health, get creative about solving problems and attain wellness?

Unnaming the Named to Show Disease for What It Is

When a person has health problems, people often engage in an age old strategy of giving the problems a name, such as autism, or asthma, or diabetes. While it may make sense to give something a name, problems can arise if the name takes on a life of its own in people’s minds. When that happens, when the name given to a problem starts being perceived as somehow the problem itself, then a whole misconception is created and people, acting on the misconception, may start saying and doing all kinds of nutty things.

For instance, a person could be having nerve health problems or memory problems, all of which are just consequences of strategies used and choices made by the person and others around the person. After the problems are named, rather than seeing them as just nerve or memory problems, people often see them as something in a way caused by an entity, a thing that comes with a name, maybe Parkinson’s disease, or Alzheimer’s disease, or als.

Now the whole thing with a name thing can take off and people even talk of being attacked by the thing with the name, as in “als attacks the nervous system” which is not really right at all, as there isn’t really anything attacking the person. Things are just deteriorating as a result of choices being made.

So, to counter any of this going on in your own mind, look at what happens when we replace disease names with a simple back to reality phase like “the consequences of choices made by them and others around them.” Doing this quickly clears things up in a pretty interesting way.

For instance, instead of saying “For fifteen years, she fought lupus”, we would have “For fifteen years, she fought the consequences of choices made by her and others around her.” Has a whole new ring to it.

Instead of saying someone “endured the ravages of als” it could be much clearer to say “he endured the ravages of the consequences of choices made by him and others around him.”

Some strategies for handling problems don’t sound as good after a problem has be unnnamed.

For instance, while maybe it somehow sounds ok if someone is “taking morphine to deal with the pain of cancer”, “taking morphine to deal with the pain of the consequences of choices” sounds rather problematic.

Some ideas start to sound kind of funny.

“They are doing research to find a cure for autism,” becomes “They are doing research to find a cure for the consequences of people’s choices.”

“Scientists wonder if they can develop a vaccine to prevent people’s experiencing als,” becomes “Scientists wonder if they can develop a vaccine to prevent people’s experiencing the consequences of their choices.” Hmm. While vaccines may have some benefits, this sounds as if it would be quite an achievement.

Will genetic or stem cell research really turn out to be the path to finally “creating a world free of the consequences of choices”?

So whenever you hear one of these names, just remember it’s just a name and what is really going on is that somehow choices being made and strategies being used are adding up to what is being experienced. Then what’s going on and what needs to be done to change what’s going on remain clear.