Sick? Face the fact that something is wrong with your ideas and ways.

Recently I was talking with someone who had been looking to reduce her weight for years. When I disagreed with something she said about how it works, she assured me that I have it wrong and she knows what she is doing.

The fact of the matter is that I have no trouble maintaining my weight right where it was when I was in high school. D’ya think it might be that I am onto something? On the other hand, if she has it all right, how come it’s not working for her?

I see this all the time, people who are having health problems and at the same time are convinced they know all about health.

A person experiencing cancer reacts to discussion of diet by saying he already has a good diet. A woman having trouble with cataracts says it has nothing to do with her way of living. A guy experiencing neurodegenerative disease totally freaks out when someone suggests he can solve it himself.

Here’s the deal. Whether it’s called or somehow blamed on cancer, Alzheimer’s, als, ms, psychosis, alcoholism, Parkinson’s, autoimmune, influenza, aids, poverty or anything else, disease happens because of things people do, things they choose, and the things they do or choose are based on their ideas.

So, as much as a person may feel that his or her ideas are right, as much as he or she feels that she is educated, competent, on the ball and doing all the right things healthwise, logic dictates otherwise. If you are sick, you have to consider the possibility, even face the fact, that something about your cherished ideas, something about your carefully or not so carefully chosen ways, is flawed and hurting you.


From Five Pills A Day To None – Guess What It Took

The other day, after asking me what I do, someone said “I believe in that” and told me about the example of her brother in law who had been diagnosed with all kinds of problems, including diabetes, and was taking five prescription pills a day.

Now, she says, he is in much better shape, has dropped two pants sizes and no longer needs any of those pills. His doctor is amazed, even confused, by the change.

What a change it is too.

I mean for one thing, drugs more block than cure, so in a way all the problems were still there, just blocked somehow, buried by the medication. Furthermore, while the medication was keeping one set of problems in check, you can be sure it was creating all kinds of new ones and the guy was headed for even worse trouble, and, by the way, all of this was probably costing plenty, not just for pills, but for the doctor visits and all the other stuff that goes along with being in such a state as to need all that medication.

Maybe most importantly, of course, not only does he no longer need all the medication, but I suspect he feels much better, in multiple ways, than he ever did when he was taking it.

Ok.  So what did it take to accomplish this?

Did it take months or years of extreme diet changes and working out? Did it take psychotherapy, years of meditation, or doing something radical like moving to a different state? Did it take some kind of bizarre surgery that involved removing a gland or something or cutting part of his brain or installing some kind of technology?


It took working with a nutritionist to improve his diet and it took doing some regular exercise and it took less than two months.

While it may not work this quickly and easily for everyone, in this case that’s all it took to go from being a heavily medicated, out of shape time bomb to being a much healthier person using zero medication.

Imagine that.

Which brings up another question. What on earth goes on in medical school?