From Five Pills A Day To None – Guess What It Took

The other day, after asking me what I do, someone said “I believe in that” and told me about the example of her brother in law who had been diagnosed with all kinds of problems, including diabetes, and was taking five prescription pills a day.

Now, she says, he is in much better shape, has dropped two pants sizes and no longer needs any of those pills. His doctor is amazed, even confused, by the change.

What a change it is too.

I mean for one thing, drugs more block than cure, so in a way all the problems were still there, just blocked somehow, buried by the medication. Furthermore, while the medication was keeping one set of problems in check, you can be sure it was creating all kinds of new ones and the guy was headed for even worse trouble, and, by the way, all of this was probably costing plenty, not just for pills, but for the doctor visits and all the other stuff that goes along with being in such a state as to need all that medication.

Maybe most importantly, of course, not only does he no longer need all the medication, but I suspect he feels much better, in multiple ways, than he ever did when he was taking it.

Ok.  So what did it take to accomplish this?

Did it take months or years of extreme diet changes and working out? Did it take psychotherapy, years of meditation, or doing something radical like moving to a different state? Did it take some kind of bizarre surgery that involved removing a gland or something or cutting part of his brain or installing some kind of technology?

Nah.

It took working with a nutritionist to improve his diet and it took doing some regular exercise and it took less than two months.

While it may not work this quickly and easily for everyone, in this case that’s all it took to go from being a heavily medicated, out of shape time bomb to being a much healthier person using zero medication.

Imagine that.

Which brings up another question. What on earth goes on in medical school?

Advertisements

Knowing Better and Still Not Doing It – “That’s the sickness.”

A week or two ago I called a friend, Diego, to see how things were going with his blood pressure. He had had really, really high blood pressure, so high that a doctor seemed concerned about even letting him walk out of the office. Diego also had come up with a pretty solid plan for solving the problem, one involving things like diet changes, weight loss, exercise and changing the way he handles life issues.

Hey. That sounded like a great idea for a story, maybe called “My Friend Diego Solves Insanely High Blood Pressure. Here’s How.”

So before writing it I wanted to confirm that he had gotten the job done.

“It is lower.”  He told me.

So it was fixed, solved, the pressure in some kind of normal or healthy range?

“No.”

I told him about my story idea and he told me that I could just wait, maybe give him another month and all would be well and I could write about it. He said he was psyched, that the idea of the story was even a good incentive for him to get on with it.

So I called him today to see how our little project was going.

The answer? No progress.

“That’s the sickness” he said. Then he noted the similarity to what his mother had done, when she had basically chosen to die rather than taking advantage of healing resources he had provided for her, and he suggested that instead of writing about his success I should write about his lack of it. “That’s the sickness.”

Not a bad idea. What he said is so right on, and what he has going on is so common. It’s a level of sickness, one in which a person knows basically how to solve a problem and for some reason, inertia, unconscious issues, or whatever, leaves the problem unsolved.

Me personally, I don’t get it. I mean, sure I get it. I understand psychology and habits and things like that. Still, I don’t get it.

For one thing, being sick can be a total drag. In Diego’s case, for instance, he has real reason to be concerned about the consequences of continuing to live with what is still rather high blood pressure.

For another, solving things can be so straightforward. Losing that eighty pounds of extra weight, for instance, seems simple. Just eat less than you burn.

So between one thing and another, staying sick, especially when one has at hand an actual plan for getting healthy, seems insane to me.

Solving back problems, lowering bad cholesterol, solving diabetes, solving cancer, resolving relationship issues, any kind of thing, a person can do it, if the person just gets through the knowing what to do level to the actually doing it level.